Analytics, Announcement, App Monetization, Resource, Tech Resources

Q2 2018 Mobile Monetization Benchmark Report is Out!

Header image - the SOOMLA ads and churn case study is out for Q4 2017, full of insights

We are excited to announce the release of our second part of the Mobile Monetization Benchmarks report for Q2 2018 today. This is one of the many industry data reports that we will continue to publish providing important insights related to monetization through ad revenue. This report gives an in-depth comparison of eCPMs for 1st impressions and overall and providing a ranking of monetization providers in the mobile industry.

The report is based on information collected through SOOMLA’s platform. The data set includes over 100M users in over 100 countries over a period of 3 months. The report focuses on the 9 countries which produced over 2.5 billion impressions. The analysis breaks down per country, platform, ad type, as well as per ad network and advertiser.

You are welcome to download the report through this link.

Feel free to share:
Marketing, Resource, Tips and Advice

The Best Mobile Gaming Conference To Attend And Why – Our Top Picks

We looked at what are the best mobile gaming conferences to attend and why.  Check out the breakdown of our top picks.

Every quarter, there are about a dozen, if not more, conferences that fall under the umbrella of mobile gaming / marketing / growth / data / analytics. Each conference tends to have a focal point, anywhere from growth, blockchain, indie gaming, monetization, retention and the list goes. Hopefully we will answer help answer “Which gaming conference should I attend / is the best?” by breaking down some of the top mobile gaming conferences out there.

The first question you should be asking yourself is, “What are my goals for the conference?”. A conference can be a great place to brainstorm ideas from peers, network, grow your client base, learn from speakers and lectures, play the upcoming games for 8 hours straight (I’m guilty of that) and of course connect with other people in your industry.

There is a pretty straightforward 10 point criteria system that should be looked at when choosing a conference:

  1. Goals
  2. Cost
  3. Location
  4. Who’s Going?
  5. Who’s Speaking?
  6. Topics / Tracks Offered
  7. Number of Relevant Topics / Sessions
  8. Conference Format
  9. Timeline
  10. Networking Opportunities

While I am sure none of those 10 criteria above are anything new to anybody who has contemplated whether or not to attend a conference, I do want to bring something new to the table here and give some insight how SOOMLA chooses which to attend.

First, let’s look at some of the conferences / events in the mobile gaming industry:

Delta DNA’s Game Industry Analytics ForumGame Industry Analytics Forum

Delta DNA’s Games Industry Analytics Forum is a series of events targeted at all industry professionals who seeks to make their games better through analytics. They bring a large mix of industry experts who speak on a variety of topics.

Name Games Industry Analytics Forum
Locations San Francisco and London
Avg. Companies NA
Avg. Attendees NA
Cost Free
Focus Analytics

Pocket Gamer Connects ConferencePocket Gamer Connects

Pocket Gamer’s Global Mobile Game Conference is held three times a year in various locations. The main focus tends to be on global game publishing strategies, opportunities in various markets. They have several (12 or so) content tracks each with a focus such as Monetization, Marketing, eSports, Growth and more.

Name Pocket Gamer Connects
Locations 3 per year: London, Helsinki, San Francisco
Avg. Companies 600+
Avg. Attendees 1200+
Cost Varies from several hundred $ to thousand +
Focus Mobile Gaming Industry

Casual Connect ConferenceCasual Connect

Casual Connects hosts several conferences across the globe, each with its own particular focus. Anywhere from developers, game design, east meets west, and game tech innovation.

Name Casual Connect
Locations 4 per year: USA, Europe, Asia, Eastern Europe
Avg. Companies 600+
Avg. Attendees 800-2000+
Cost Varies from several hundred $ to thousand+
Focus Mobile Gaming Industry

White Nights ConferenceWhite Nights

White Nights is considered to be a business conference for the gaming industry. They are focused on all aspects of the gaming industry, including mobile, PC, console, web, AR and VR.

Name White Nights
Locations 4 per year: Prague, St. Petersburg, Moscow and Berlin
Avg. Companies 800+
Avg. Attendees 1600+
Cost Several hundred $
Focus Business of Games

Mobile Growth SummitMobile Growth Summit

Mobile Growth Summit is a non-vendor conference targeted at those who work in the mobile growth industry. The conference aims to bring mobile growth and marketing professionals together to connect and learn from one another in areas such as UA, monetization, retention and eCommerce.

Name Mobile Growth Summit
Locations 4 per year: Prague, St. Petersburg, Moscow and Berlin
Avg. Companies 300+
Avg. Attendees 600+
Cost Varies from several hundred $ to thousand +
Focus Mobile Growth / Marketing

Mobile Games ForumMobile Games Forum

Mobile Games Forum brings together gaming industry decision makers to discuss the direction of the industry and potential strategies. The larger portion of attendees tends to be C level, senior managers and directors.

Name Mobile Games Forum
Locations 2 per year: London and Seattle
Avg. Companies 300+
Avg. Attendees 600+
Cost Several hundred $
Focus Upper Management / Decision Makers

Game Developers ConferenceGame Developers Conference

Game Developers Conference is a 5 day event that attracts thousands of attendees from all over the world. They have a wide variety of tracks / sessions on just about every topic from blockchain to VR to monetization. Many up and coming publishers use the conference as a great opportunity to show off their upcoming games.

Name Game Developer Conference
Locations San Francisco
Avg. Companies 700+
Avg. Attendees 3000+
Cost Depends on type of ticket: from free to several hundred.
Focus All things gaming

Game ConnectionGame Connection

Game Connection is a business convention for the game industry where publishers, developers, service providers and distributors come to find new partners and/or new clients. Considered to be the go-to conference for business.

Name Game Connection
Locations Paris and San Francisco
Avg. Companies 1500+
Avg. Attendees 2700+
Cost Several hundred $
Focus Business Creation for Game Industry

As you can see, each conference does have it own focus, and depending on what you are looking to achieve, one of the above conferences should meet your goals.

Criteria # 11 – The Meeting System

One of the topics that we did not cover however is the meeting systems that is made available to the attendees. Depending on the purpose of attending the conference, this could be irrelevant to you, but if you do plan to attend for networking purposes, a good meeting system can dramatically improve the success of your trip. Here are a few of the meeting systems we’ve encountered at SOOMLA:

Feature Pitch&Match MeetToMatch Let's Meet Bizzabo
Profile Creation Y Y Y Y
Search Filters Y Y Y Y
Internal Messaging Y Y
Mobile App Y
Block Meeting Time Slots Y Y Y
Agenda Export Y Y Y Y
“Smart” Scheduling System* Y

Smart System* refers to the meeting system’s method of organizing meetings. Let’s Meet is the only system that allows you to request a meeting without a set time before the event. Generally about a week before the event, all the meetings that have been accepted are automatically filled into your calendar based on a mutual time slot being available. This is significantly different and advantageous compared to the other meeting systems that require you to set a time, limiting your ability to be flexible.

Conclusion

While each conference has its own focus, you are bound to find a mobile gaming conference that meets your criteria. If you think there are any more that are worth mentioning, let us know in the comments below!

Feel free to share:
Marketing, Resource, Tech Resources, Tips and Advice

Complete Mobile Advertising Glossary – Over 70 Terms Defined

SOOMLA's complete mobile advertising glossary - we've broken down the top 70 terms in ad tech to be easily understood.

From newcomers to mobile industry veterans, the amount of acronyms and terms that exist can be daunting, and frankly, often times confusing. The industry is constantly evolving, and with that, comes a steady flow of new terminology. We’ve compiled a list of 70 terms that are most prevalent in adtech and broken them down into easy to understand terms.

Here is the complete glossary to mobile advertising at your fingertips. Read, take notes and prosper.

1st Impression

Refers to the first ad displayed to a user within a session. Considered to be the most valuable in terms of eCPM.

1st Look

Ad-networks are prioritized in a a waterfall where the 1st ad-network gets to “look” at the ad request and decide if they want to provide an ad or not. If the ad-network passes the turn goes down the waterfall to the 2nd ad-network. When an ad-network asks for “1st look” it means they want to sit on the top of the waterfall and have the opportunity to see all the ad requests.

1st Price Auction

Where a bidder pays exactly what they bid. Often times leading to inflated prices and a lower demand for that publisher’s inventory.

2nd Price Auction

Where the top bidder pays the what the second highest bid was + $0.01. Allows for the saving of money due to overestimation of the value of a publisher’s inventory.

A/B Testing

A test in which all variables are identical aside from one. The purpose is to compare the two versions and see which performs better according to the established KPI.

Ad Exchange

An ad exchange refers to a platform that helps facilitate the buying and selling of advertiser inventory from multiple ad networks.

Ad Inventory

The amount of (virtual) space a publisher has available to be sold to advertisers. Also known as “ad space”.

Ad Mediation

A platform that sends requests for advertisements to multiple ad networks for publishers, ensuring the ad space is filled with the best possible deal.

Ad Network

An ad network connects advertisers and publishers looking to generate revenue by serving ads in a mobile app or website.

Ad Revenue

The amount of revenue generated from placing advertisements in an application / website.

Ad Whales

Refers to a group of users who make the most amount of ad revenue. Typically this is defined as the top 10% or 20% of the users who make 70% or 80% of the ad revenue. In other cases, the ad-whales are defined as a threshold of $0.7 (the equivalent of a $1 IAP).

Advertiser Blacklisting

The process of publishers blacklisting specific advertisers from appearing in their app. Some ad networks provide this as an option to publishers. The blacklisting is often based on competition, poor eCPMs or inappropriate content.

CASE STUDY ON OPT-IN RATES & SOOMLA INSIGHTS

Advertiser Identity

Identifying which advertisers are advertising in one’s app and their respective performance.

API

Application Program Interface. An API opens access to a limited part of a piece of software, allowing 3rd party developers to access previously unaccessible information.

ARPU

(Average Revenue Per User). Calculated by dividing the total revenue by the number of users across a time perdiod (generally monthly or annually).

ASO

(App Store Optimization). The process of improving the visibility of an app in the respective app store (Google Play, iTunes, etc.)

Attribution

The process of accrediting a traffic source with the conversion. Each platform has it’s own methodologies for doing so.

Audience

A group of consumers / users within a specific target market which are targetted for a specific ad campaign.

Blacklist

A list of advertisers that a publisher has decided to not allow to appear within their app.

Churn Rate

The rate at which users have stopped using an app during a specific time period

CLV

(Customer Lifetime Value). Has the same meaning to LTV – the total value of a user if given enough time to fully exhaust all opportunities to pay or watch ads in the game. This value is often averaged across a group of users (cohort) and most publishers try to create models for future prediction of CLV/LTV based on the activity of the first few days so they can make quick decisions on the marketing side.

Cohort

A group of users that share one or more similar characteristics. Used for grouping in data analysis.

CPA

(Cost Per Acquisition). The cost a publisher incurs to bring a new user through various paid channels.

CPC

(Cost Per Click). A campaign where the advertiser is charged everytime a user clicks on the ad they are shown.

CPI

(Cost Per Install). A campaign where a price is paid when a user views an ad, goes to the app store and installs an app.

CPM

(Cost per Mile). A campaign were advertisers pay for every thousand times the advertisement is shown.

CTR

(Click-Through-Rate). The ratio of users who click on an ad / opt-in to the total users who were displayed an ad.

DAU

(Daily Active Users). How many users open your app on a daily basis. This is one of the key metrics used to measure ad revenue.

Direct Deal

Rather than going through an ad network or mediation platform, publishers can make direct deals with advertisers, cutting out the middle men.

DSP

(Demand Side Platform). A platform in which marketers can buy ad inventory from multiple ad exchanges in one place.

eCPM

(Effective Cost Per Thousand). A metric used to measure ad revenue generated. Generally calculated by dividing total revenue earned by total number of impressions in the thousands.

eCPM Decay

The inevitable decrease in eCPM as ads begin to be displayed to your users. There are however methods proven to help slow it down.

Fill Rate

The number of ads requested that are successfully filled in relation to the total number of ads requested. Tends to be displayed in a percentage format.

Frequency / Frequency Capping

The rate at which users are shown ads. For example, some apps place a frequency cap of 4 ads per day for users.

GDPR

(General Data Protection Regulation). A comprehensive new set of regulations designed to give EU citizens more control / oversight on their personal data and the entities that collect it. Under GDPR, companies will need to notify their customers when collecting personal data. Consent can be given or denied based on the purpose of the data usage.

Header Bidding

The process by which publishers open ad space to be bid upon by multiple ad exchanges, resulting in an increased yield and revenue.

IAP Cannibalization

The notion that the integration of incentivized rewarded videos are damaging to the revenue gained from in-app purchases.

IDFA

The “Identifier for Advertisers” is a random identifier number given by Apple to a user’s device. It is used for advertising targeting.

Impression

Refers to the moment when an ad is fetched from its source and dispalyed to the user. Each ad type has a varying distinction of when the impression occurs. For banner ads, once an ad is fetched from its source and the user sees the ad. For video ads, the impressions is logged once the first frame of the video is displayed.

Interstitials Ads

Ads that are full-screen which are typically displayed at natural transition points in the flow of an app. For example, between levels or when the game is paused.

Q1 2018 MONETIZATION BENCHMARKS

Lookalikes

A method of targeting additional users based on similarities to existing users. Generally based on geo, interests, gender, age etc.

LTV

(Lifetime Value). Has the same meaning to CLV – the total value of a user if given enough time to fully exhaust all opportunities to pay or watch ads in the game. This value is often averaged across a group of users (cohort) and most publishers try to create models for future prediction of CLV/LTV based on the activity of the first few days so they can make quick decisions on the marketing side.

MAU

(Monthly Active Users) How many users open your app on a monthly basis. This is another of the key metrics used to measure ad revenue.

Mobile Ad Fraud

The process which fraudsters cheat advertisers into displaying ads to fake users / bot traffic.

Multi-Touch Attribution

Allows for the attiributing of all channels in the conversion process. Different from the existing last touch approach.

Offer Wall

A list of incentives which a user can receive by performing a specific action, typically downloading another app, watching a video ad, or sharing content on social media. The rewards for doing so tend to be some form of digital currency or other in-app incentives.

Opt In

When a user actively agrees to participate in viewing an ad.

Pipelining

The process of moving data from one point to another.

Playable Ads

Ads that request the user to interact, often showing off the basic gameplay of the game being advertised.

Postbacks

The ability to notify a third party of a specific event that occurs within an app (install, in-app event, etc.)

Programmatic

An automated process for purchasing digitial advertising, eliminating the need for a human touch.

Reach

The number of unique users who can potentially be targeted by advertising.

Real-Time Bidding

Bidding on inventory in real-time. The bid is often dynamically generated based on past performance of creatives, inventory, user groups, and other parameters.

Retargeting

A marketing effort in which targeted online advertisements are shown to users based on their previous behaviour.

Rewarded Video Ads

Video ads that are offer the user the option to opt-in to view them in order to receive some incentive. Can range from free coins, extra lives to free uprades.

ROI

(Return on investment). A performance measure used to determine the efficiency of an investment / effort.

SDK

(Software Development Kit). A set of software development tools that can be added to existing apps to support new capabilities.

SDK Mediation

Mediation of ad-networks allows publishers to use a few ad-networks in parallel and maximize fill rates and eCPM. SDK mediation is a form of mediation where each ad-networks installs an SDK on the publisher’s app and the mediation is done on the client side.

Server Side Mediation

Server side mediaiton is a form of mediation. Unlike SDK mediation, the goal of maximizing fill rates and eCPMs for the publisher is acheived with a single SDK provided by the mediaiton company and the ad-networks have to serve their ads through that SDK. This means that the mediaion is done on the server side

Share of Voice

Refers to the portion that one company controls out of the total. In terms of ads, can refer to an ad network who maintains a larger share of voice in rewarded video displays in comparison to other ad networks.

SSP

(Supply Side Platform) A platform that allows publishers to sell their advertising inventory in an automated way.

Target Audience

A group of consumers / users within a specific target market which are targetted for a specific ad campaign.

Traceback

SOOMLA’s unique ability to traceback individual user’s ad behavior.

Tracker

A tracker is a link structure generated by the attribution platform on behalf of the advertiser. The tracker is than passed along to the ad-network so clicks on the ads of the advertiser which are associated with the ad-networks can be identified through the unique link structure of the tracker.

Unified auction

On open auction where all ad networks are given an equal opportunity to bit on an app’s inventory, without any preferential treatment, in which the highest bid tends to win.

UDID

(Unique User ID). A unique identifier assigned to each device. Apple and Google have their own methods for doing so.

User Acquisition

The marketing efforts to acquire new users through advertising campaigns.

VAST Tag

(Video Ad Serving Template). A universal XML-based protocol specification created by the IAB for serving video ads.

Whitelisting

The opposite of blacklisting in which certain entities are explicitly approved.

Yield Management

The use of tools and business practices to maximize revenue.


Find a term that we didn’t define here? Let us know in the comments below and we’ll get them added ASAP.

Feel free to share:
Analytics, Announcement, App Monetization, Resource, Tech Resources

Industry’s First Monetization Benchmark

Header image - the SOOMLA ads and churn case study is out for Q4 2017, full of insights

We are excited to announce our industry first “Q1 2018: Monetization Benchmarks” report today. This is one of the many industry data reports that we will continue to publish providing important insights related to monetization through ad revenue. This report gives an in-depth comparison of eCPMs for 1st impressions and overall and providing a ranking of monetization providers in the mobile industry.

You are welcome to download the report through this link.

Here are the quick take-aways from the report:

  • Advertisers and monetization providers are clearly paying a premium for first impressions. The premium can be as high as 100% of the average eCPM, sometimes higher
  • Monetization providers and advertisers have different bidding strategies when it comes to first impressions. Some are more aggressive while others seem indifferent to the impression sequence
  • Games tend to have a bigger focus on getting the 1st impression in comparison to non-gaming advertisers who appear to be indifferent to whether or not they are shown 1st.
  • There are a few advertisers who repeatedly show up in the top 10 across different ad formats and platforms. They are able to do that by having a clear data advantage. When negotiating prices for 1st impression – make sure you have enough data.

 

Feel free to share:

Top 12 Rewarded Video Ad Networks for Mobile Apps

Top 12 rewarded video ad providers for mobile apps including: Unity Ads, Vungle, Adcolony, Receptiv, Admob, FAN, Mopub, Ironsource, Fyber, Tapjoy, Chartboost and Applovin

Video ads are becoming an increasingly important monetization format. Even the biggest app companies are utilizing video ads as part of their monetization strategy and specifically, mobile gaming companies have widely adopted the rewarded video ad format that provides a positive experience for the user and is positively correlated with engagement and retention according to a few researches.

In this post you will find a list of the top 12 rewarded video ad providers divided into 4 categories:

  • Video only networks
  • Ad networks that moved strategically into rewarded video
  • Video ad networks with a mediation platform
  • Media giants who recently moved in
FREE REPORT – VIDEO ADS RETENTION IMPACT

Video Only Networks

These ad networks are purely focused on monetization through video ads. They don’t offer any other ad format and some of them played a major role in educating the market on the benefits of rewarded video ads.

Vungle logo - a video ad networkVungle

Vungle are a key contributor in popularizing video ads among mobile app publishers. When they started out they were focusing on 15 second videos and were offering to produce the videos as part of the deal. Vungle is a private company and is backed by a long list of investors and raised $25M to date.

Name Vungle
Head Quarters San Francisco
Founded 2011
Employees (by Linkedin) 216
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 24% of top 200 Apps
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 26% of top 200 Apps
Global Reach 500M

adcolony logo - the company was the first one to offer rewarded video ads in mobile appsAdcolony

Adcolony is the first company to offer rewarded video ads for mobile apps and they are still one of the top providers in the field. They are 100% focused on video ads and are high on the list of any app publisher who wishes to monetize his app with video ads. Adcolony was acquired by Opera in 2014 for $350M but remained a seperate entity.

Name Adcolony
Head Quarters San Francisco
Founded 2011
Employees (by Linkedin) 540
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 20% of top 200 Apps
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 28% of top 200 Apps
Global Reach 1.4B

Unity ads logo - in 2014 Unity acquired Applifier to offer monetization through video ads to it's developer baseUnity Ads

Unity Ads came to life through the acquisition of Applifier by Unity. Since the acquisition, the video focused ad network experienced fast growth leveraging the dominance of the Unity game engine in the mobile space.

Name UnityAds
Head Quarters San Francisco
Founded Unity was founded in 2003 although video only came later
Employees (by Linkedin) 1,448 (Total Unity employees)
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 21% of top 200 Apps
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 27% of top 200 Apps
Global Reach 770M
 
We also wrote up an in-depth full post on the comparison between ad networks. This will help provide all the details needed for choosing the right Ad Network for your mobile app. Check out the article or download the full comparison spreadsheet below for free.

FREE AD NETWORK COMPARISON SPREADSHEET

Receptiv, formerly known as Mediabrix is 100% focused on video ads and their unique offering to advertisers is that the ads will be exposed to users in the glory moments of the gaming experience.Receptiv (formerly Mediabrix)

Receptive who are also known as Mediabrix prior to their rebrand, have a unique offering compared to the last 3 companies mentioned. The company is based only on brand advertisers and has its head quarters in NY where they can be close to the media agencies. To the advertisers, they offer the opportunity to be associated with the winning moments of the user inside the game. To the publisher they offer diversified demand with high eCPM.

Name Receptiv
Head Quarters New York
Founded 2011
Employees (by Linkedin) 84
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) N/A
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) N/A
Global Reach 150M

Ad networks who moved strategically into rewarded video

Applovin logo - the company offers video ads and rewarded videos among other formats but it's still considered a leading providerApplovin

Applovin was making waves in the ad-tech space last year by announcing it’s acquisition for $1.4B. The deal was experiencing some trouble and was not finalized as of today [July 2017]. Regardless of the acquisition, the company is operating as a seperate entity either way and is doing well financially. On the advertiser side, the company offers more control compared to other networks through their self-serve interface. On the publisher side they specialize in interstitials and video ads.

Name Applovin
Head Quarters Palo Alto
Founded 2012
Employees (by Linkedin) 135
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 22% of top 200 Apps
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 25% of top 200 Apps
Global Reach 500M (2014)

Chartboost logo - the company started by offering interstitial ads but made a strategic move to get into video adsChartboost

Chartboost started it’s way as a marketplace for direct deals and was one of the main contributors to the adoption of interstitials as a tool to promote games within other games. Chartboost came a bit late to the video ads space but were catching up quickly by leveraging the distribution of their SDK.

Name Chartboost
Head Quarters San Francisco
Founded 2011
Employees (by Linkedin) 134
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 17%
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 23%
Global Reach 1B

Tapjoy logo - one of the longest lasting independent providers who offers video ads among other monetization formatsTapjoy

Founded in 2007, Tapjoy made a significant transition from incentivized offers to video ads back in 2012. Currently they have been boasting impressive growth, grabbing larger chunks of the mobile advertising market share. From recent statistics, Tapjoy is estimated to be used in over 20,000 mobile apps.

Name TapJoy
Head Quarters San Francisco
Founded 2007
Employees (by Linkedin) 235
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 12%
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 13%
Global Reach 520M

Video ad networks who also provide mediation

Iron source logo - the video devision came through the acquisition of Supersonic who offers a mediation platform as well as an ad-network for rewarded videosSupersonic / IronSource

Supersonic became part of IronSource via the all Israeli acquisition valued at $250M. Together they are now considered the leader in mobile video mediation. In addition to the mediation service they also have their own video ad network which helps publishers top their fill rates.

Name IronSource
Head Quarters Tel-Aviv
Founded 2009
Employees (by Linkedin) 667 working at IronSource and about 265 in the mobile video division
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 9%
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 12%
Global Reach 800M (for video only)

Fyber logo - the company offers monetization through it's own demand as well as SSP and mediation platform for videoFyber

Fyber started as an offer wall provider by the name of SponsorPay but later on rebranded as Fyber and shifted more of it’s focus towards SSP and mediation with a strong emphasis on video ads. They acquired competing mediation service Heyzap to become a close second to fast growing IronSource / Supersonic platform.

Name Fyber
Head Quarters Berlin
Founded 2009
Employees (by Linkedin) 302
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 5%
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 6%
Global Reach 500M

Media giants who recently moved in to the video space

Admob by Google recently moved into the rewarded video ad spaceAdmob / Google

Google needs no introduction and their mobile ad service Admob which became part of Google through the $750M acquisition in the early days of Smartphones is today the dominant way to monetize apps on Google Play. The giant rolled out rewarded video ads in March 2017. While they are showing later for the party we are sure that their size will allow them to gain momentum quickly.

Name Admob by Google
Head Quarters Mountain View
Founded 1998
Employees (by Linkedin) 76,510
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 33%
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 70%
Global Reach 1B+

Facebook audience network also started offering rewarded video ads. As of June 2017 this offering is still in beta.Facebook Audience Network

Facebook dominates as a destination site for mobile ads but in recent years they have been evolving an ad network by the name of Facebook Audience Network and as of June 2017, FAN is also offering rewarded video ads.

Name Facebook Audience Network
Head Quarters Menlo Park
Founded 2004
Employees (by Linkedin) 19,150
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 28%
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 39%
Global Reach +1B

Mopub logo - the twitter subsidiary is now also offering rewarded video adsMopub / Twitter

Mopub was acquired by Twitter in 2013 for $350M (read more here). It kept it’s identity since and is one of the top 2 mediation platforms and and SSPs in mobile apps when it comes to banners interestitials and native ads. They showed up a bit late to the video ads space and launched video ads marketplace and mediation towards the end of 2015. Their stronger push in the video market only happened in 2017 however.

Name Mopub/Twitter
Head Quarters San Francisco
Founded 2006
Employees (by Linkedin) 3,662 (at Twitter)
iOS Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 16%
Android Market Share (by Mighty Signal) 25%
Global Reach 1B+

 

Feel free to share:
App Monetization, Resource

Top 5 Mobile Retention Software In The Game Today

Top 5 Mobile Retention Software : Apsalar, Urban Airship, Swrve, AppSee, Localytics, Countly

Thinking about successful companies like Facebook, Google or Instagram, one thing comes up as an underlying factor for all of them and that is – sustainable growth. We are long past the point where download numbers acts as the main success metric. We now know that the majority of mobile users end up deleting the app after the first 72 hours, so retaining as many as possible becomes essential.

Tech giants and investors are realizing that if your app has a ‘user leak’ somewhere, throwing money into ads, manipulating push notifications and incentivizing new downloads doesn’t do the trick. The solution then comes in the form of retention software solutions. Opportunities to surprise, delight and retain your customers as well as create unique experiences for them are increasing due to the level of detailed data available out there. Product iteration (“updatability”), incentivizing users, mobile personalization of apps and new developments in push notification all make for amazing retention capabilities.

With such a vibrant field, we decided to do some digging to find the best retention software available out there. Here is our honest take on the pros and cons of the top 5 retention software available to you today. Note, the list is not written in a particular order.

We also wrote up an in-depth full post on the comparison between ad networks. This will help provide all the details needed for choosing the right Ad Network for your mobile app. Check out the article or download the full comparison spreadsheet below for free.

FREE AD NETWORK COMPARISON SPREADSHEET

Apsalar logo - a video ad networkApsalar

We start our list off with Apsalar that recently merged with Singular to bring us a pretty robust marketing analytics platform. The platform offers a lifecycle management solution for both marketers and mobile app developers. The main focus of the platform is to get the right users for you, to analyze them, offer great analytics and give advice on how to target your users with various campaigns. Similar to Google Analytics, but yet different since Apsalar focused on mobile from the start. It can offer actionable analytics, which will help you keep an eye on your revenue, user engagement as well as retention. Here are some pros and cons of the platform

Pros Cons
Segment comparison (user segmentation as well) No custom dashboard
Engagement analysis No messaging service
Can acquire users for you
Create funnels
Analytics across multiple apps
Free tool that allows specific user targeting

Urban Airship logoUrban Airship

Mobile engagement company founded back in 2009 in the US. Combining app push messages, proximity targeting and analytics, the company has focused on vertical growth and industries such as media and entertainment, retail, sports, travel and hospitality. They cover companies such as ABS news, Adidas and Virgin Galactic to name a few. The company pushes over 10 billion messages a month to over 2 billion active app installs.

Pros Cons
Free Trial pricy
Amazing throughput
High security
Real time retention package

SwrveSwrve

Some would call it a comprehensive mobile marketing platform, which in a sense it is. The dashboard is offered with numerous iterations to suit anyone’s taste. Funnels, cohort analysis, vanity, retention, monetization, all of these tools can be located on the main dashboard which allows for quick access and adjustments. Besides push notifications, the bread and butter of the company is app analytics, A/B testing as well as in app campaigns. It managed to secure business from the likes of Electronic Arts, Sony and Warner Bros. Here are some pros and cons of this platform.

Pro Cons
Segmentation capabilities which allow push message personalization Pricing not published publicly on the site
Analytic tools for A/B testing Web interface is a bit clunky
Great dashboard Pricy
FREE REPORT – VIDEO ADS RETENTION IMPACT

AppSeeAppSee

This platform has a very unique approach to marketing. In essence it’s a visual in-app analytics platform. What does this mean? By stimulating you with various visuals (and numerous colors), the platform helps you measure, understand and improve the user’s experience. With “classic” analytics you also get an additional bonus of getting access to information on users’ behavior. They provide you with real user sessions so that you can understand what happens and when (example: why users don’t finish their registration form). Heatmaps are very intuitively designed and can help you tons in figuring out where your users focus. User interaction will lead to events creation which, in turn, you can use to create conversion funnels in the platform itself. Some pros and cons:

Pro Cons
Unique visuals Pricy
Free Trial Customizability finite
Playback recordings of user sessions
Automatic integration
Crash recording

LocalyticsLocalytics

A very good mobile analytics and marketing platform that covers Android, iPhone, iPad, HTML5, Windows apps and Blackberry. Like Appsee, Localytics also offers the ability to monitor user behavior on mobile and web devices, but in real time. The company was founded in 2009 and now supports over 37 000 apps, their grit has lead them to land business with Skype, HBO, eBay, Microsoft and other big names. The whole idea of the platform is to take action based on insights that you get from watching users interact with apps in real time, they tied in a marketing add-on that will let you target users for specific actions. Here are our pros and cons for Localytics:

Pros Applovin
Real time engagement tracking A bit tricky to integrate
User insights – trend tracking in retention No external API
Personalized messages, ads and campaigns No change graph for funnels
Great support Data not delivered in real time
Sending in app messages and push notifications

CountlyBonus: Countly

We just couldn’t resist to add Countly to our list, it is not one of the leading analytics tools however it has a unique position, great UI and an intuitive design. It is dear to us since it is an open source mobile analytics application, which offers data in real time, with an easy to use dashboard and all info you need at a glance. It lacks some segmentation options that the leaders in the field have, but if you’re looking for a free and helpful solution, we would recommend this cool platform.

Conclusion

Though your favorite platform may not be on the list, we tried to focus on elements that will make your life easier when utilizing the platform such as user-friendly interface, customization ability, multiple OS, user retention capabilities, or push notification functionality. We hope that this list helps you find your favorite mobile retention software solution.

Feel free to share:
App Monetization, Resource

Top 10 Resources for Understanding Customer Lifetime Value

top_10_resources_for_understanding_customer_lifetime_value

Customer Lifetime Value is one of the most important metrics to track for every service oriented business including free mobile apps, websites, free to play games, SAAS, music subscriptions, phone subscriptions and many others. There  is still, however, a lot of uncertainty around LTV calculations, how to use it and where to find the data to feed the formules. This post is trying to sort through the life time value maze.

Customer Lifetime Value Resource List:

1) Who Should Track LTV and Who Shouldn’t

Published: May 25, 2016

There are many resources showing how to calculate ltv but it’s really not for everyone. Some apps and websites should use other models.

 

img_33462) 6 Customer Lifetime Value Calculators

Published: Apr 26, 2016

6 calculators showing how to calculate customer lifetime value. Full explanation and links to additional resources such as spreadsheets and excel files. This is a great resource for anyone who is a beginner in LTV. Bookmark this link for future use.

3) Calculating LTV for Your First UA Campaign

Published: Jun 21, 2016

How do you calculate Life Time Value (LTV)? There are a number of formulas circulating but how do you know which is the right version for you? Here’s some tips and pointers that are specifically targeted for publishers are measuring LTV for UA campaigns.

4) 7 Analytics Platforms with Built In LTV Reporting

Published: Jun 30, 2016

Some analytics platforms offer LTV reports and also prediction of the lifetime value. This research brings together 7 platforms to consider and provides details about their LTV models and the pros and cons of each one.

5) Calculating LTV with Google Analytics

Published: Jun 8, 2016

Google Analytics for mobile apps doesn’t show LTV. These slides explains how to retrieve retention numbers and find the DAU in the Google Analytics screens. The slides show how to feed the data into an online calculator to get the LTV prediction.

5 surprising facts about customer lifetime value of mobile games6) 5 Surprising Facts about Customer Lifetime Value in Mobile Games

Published: Aug 7, 2016

LTV – life time value is a key metric many mobile game publishers follow. Here are 5 things that even some of the experts didn’t know.

 

7) Calculating LTV for a Mobile Game – Methosd for Different Stages

Published: May 9, 2016

Calculating LTV for a game in design phases is different compared to the soft launch phase which is again different from the lauch phase. This post describes the calcualtion in different phases and suggests additional resources such as CLV calculators.

8) Flurry Analytics – Calculating LTV (Slides)

Published: Jun 6, 2016

App developers who use Flurry analytics have hard time getting their LTV – user lifetime value. This presentation shows how to do it easily with a free online calculator. The first section is showing how to retrieve retention and DAU data from flurry dashboard and the second part explains how to use the calculator to ge the results.

 

9) Apple Subscription Model – LTV Formula

Published: Jul 5, 2016

Calculating LTV for apps that use the apple subscription model. This post includes a formula as well as a calculator.

 

10) Easy to use Customer Lifetime Value Spreadsheet 

Published: Sep 11, 2016

Our best LTV model brings together simplicity and accuracy. Input only 6 parameters and get d60, d90, d180 and d365 LTV results.

 

Feel free to share:
App Monetization, Resource, Startup Tips

App Revenue Calculator – How Much You Can Make

img_3323

Many app developers are looking to project their app revenue as they are starting out. This is obviously an important question as publishers needs to justify the development effort in their mobile apps. The answer is dependent on many parameters and quite complex to answer. However, we identified the key drivers and created the following calculator for you. Below the calculator you can find explanation of all the fields.

Q1 2018 MONETIZATION BENCHMARKS

Mobile App Revenue Calculator

Calculator Explanation and Fields

The calculator has 4 parts:

  • Retention Inputs
  • Monetization Inputs
  • Traffic Inputs
  • Output / Results

Retention Inputs

Here you will need to input your D1, D7, D14 and D30 retention figures. If you are unclear about how to do this we highly recommend checking these guides for getting your retention in Flurry and GA. Even if you are using another analytics platform it will give you a sense of what you are looking for. In short d1 retention is how many users played your game 1 day after the first day they played. If you had 1,000 users that downloaded your game and played it in one specific day and the next day 350 of them came back to play again your D1 retention is 35%. One popular benchmark in the mobile games industry is 40%,20%,10% for D1, D7 and D30 retention – this is considered good retention and not all games get there.

Monetization Inputs

In order to calculate your app revenue, we need 2 types of monetization inputs: IAP and Ads. For In-App Purchase (IAP), the two input fields are:

  • Conversion rate to payers
  • Average Revenue Per Paying User (ARPPU)

The ARPPU is impacted greatly based on what type of app you have. Some apps and games simply sell remove ads for $1 and then the ARPPU will be $1. Strategy game apps on the other hand allow the user to build armies and castles by buying virtual currency and create a competitive state that can lead users to spend hundreds of dollars in the app.

On the Ad side of things, you will need to enter the following fields:

  • Opt-in ratio to rewarded video
  • Number of rewarded videos you expect your user to see in a typical day
  • Number of interstitials you expect users to watch in a typical day
  • Number of banners per day

Note that most apps don’t have all 3 at the same time. If your app doesn’t have one of these ad types, simply put 0 (zero). The opt-in ratio to rewarded video is a tricky one if you haven’t started out yet. Consider these values:

  • 10% if you are hiding it inside the virtual goods store
  • 20% if you are prompting users in a specific situations as they run out of a resource
  • 40-60% if you are going to measure and optimize on this parameter and have multiple prompts on a daily basis

If your app have interstitial videos as opposed to rewarded videos, just treat them as regular interstitials.

Traffic Inputs

Another critical set of data for calculating the app revenue is how many users you will have. You will need to enter the expected number of downloads per day and the traffic mix between Tier 1 (US, UK, CA, AU, DE, FR, NO, FI, SE) and Tier 2 countries. If you are unsure about the values for these fields or other fields in the calculator you can also check out our game benchmarks post.

Outputs/ Results

Here you will find the estimated daily app revenue alongside other results:

  • User life days – this is how many days the average user will play in your game over his entire life
  • DAU – how many users open your app on a daily basis
  • Tier1 ARPDAU – the daily revenue per active users for tier 1 countries
  • Tier2 ARPDAU – the daily app revenue per user in tier 2 countries
  • The ratio of ad revenue out of the total

We also wrote up a full post on the comparison between ad networks here or download the full comparison spreadsheet below for free.

FREE REPORT – VIDEO ADS RETENTION IMPACT
Feel free to share:
Analytics, App Monetization, Resource

Improved LTV Model Based on Readers Feedback

ltv model

In previous blog posts I posted 6 different LTV calculators and received a lot of feedback about the LTV models. Turns out game publishers found them super useful for calculating the LTV of their game. It was great to hear the positive feedback which also led to a lot of conversations about how people are calculating their LTV. Here are some of the learnings I can share.

Specific LTV model is always better than generic one

All our LTV calculators can’t be nearly as accurate as the ones you can build in-house. If you have the money to hire a data sceintist or at least contract one to build a formula for you after you have gethered some data, you will end up with a more accurate model. The reason is simple, in predictive modeling, the more signals you have the more accurate the model will be. All our calculators use retention and arpdau because they need to be widely applicable. However, there are a lot more signals you can feed to a specific model: tutorial completion, level progress, soft currency engagement, challenges completed, … Factoring such signals would give you a better prediction model. Our generic calculators’ main purpose is to get you started, give you a framework to think about LTV prediction and help you do some basic modeling if you are on a budget.

Simplified spreadsheet modeling

Our original spreadsheet model was taking in 31 points of data. However, after talking with readers I learned that most of you only track 4 retention data points and 1 arpdau point. This is why I created a version that is simpler on the input side. Another feedback I received is that you want more outputs: Day 60, Day 90, Day 180 and Day 365 LTV. Here is the new calculator based on all that feedback.

Inputs:

  • Day1 retention
  • Day7 retention
  • Day14 retention
  • Day30 retention
  • ARPDAU

Outputs:

  • Day60 LTV
  • Day90 LTV
  • Day180 LTV
  • Day365 LTV

Method:

This spreadsheet is the same one from the retention modeling we presented in this post but with a few tweaks.

The actual spreadsheet

 

If you want to measure the ads LTV in addition to IAP LTV you should check out SOOMLA Traceback – Ad LTV as a Service.

Learn More

Feel free to share:
Resource

33 Mobile Game Benchmarks and Rules of Thumb

image

One of the most effective tools in business is using back of the envelope calculations using rules of thumb or benchmarks. This method is highly useful when trying to quickly evaluate opportunities before committing resources for in-depth research. In Mobile games, there are already established benchmarks for many KPIs you would need when trying to calculate things on an envelope. We collected 33 of these in this post. Save this link for the right time.

FREE E-BOOK – TOP 10 MOBILE GAMING REPORTS

Retention and Engagement

  1. 2d retention – 40% is on the high side of the spectrum
  2. 7d retention – 20% is on the high side
  3. 30d retention – 10% is on the high side
  4. MAU DAU ratio – poor ratio is 1:10, really addictive games get 1:3 – 33% of their users play every day
  5. Session length in mobile games – 7.5 minutes is a good overall benchmark but some genres like card and board are getting between 10 and 15 minutes.
  6. Time spent per day – According to flurry the average user spent 33 minutes per day in mobile games during Q2/15. This stat is down from 52 in Q1 that year.

Marketing and User Acquisition

  1. Marketing spend from total revenue – If we look at public companies we can find these ratios in their income statements:
    • Zynga: 22%
    • Glu:20%
    • King:18%
    • In smaller companies we can expect the ratio to be closer to 30%
  2. CPI in tier 1 countries – high $10 (for strategy), low $2 (for casual games)
  3. Download boost when getting featured – games saw an average boost of 130% in H2/2015 according to a research by App Annie
  4. Top charts download boost – for games 100% boost (an additional organic install for every paid one)
  5. First week ROI on UA – For an app with 40%,20%,10% the first week contribution is 12%. For apps with worse retention, this number needs to be closer to 20%
  6. Top-10 threshold: Apple’s top free chart – 72,000/day, Apple’s top grossing chart – $47,000
  7. Top-25 threshold: Apple’s top free chart – 32,000/day, Apple’s top grossing chart – $23,000
  8. Top-50 threshold: Apple’s top free chart – 23,000/day, Apple’s top grossing chart – $12,000, Google’s top grossing – $6,600
  9. CTR – for banners we have seen reports of 0.25% to 0.75%, for intersitials it can go up to 5% and even 10% but a lot of those are accidental clicks.
  10. Install Rate – According to Branchmetrics – click-to-install rate is 11.9% on iOS and 13.5% on Android. US rates are lower – only 6%. The report also shows the install rate by channel.
FREE REPORT – VIDEO ADS RETENTION IMPACT

Game Monetization

  1. ARPDAU in tier 1 countries – the lowest we have seen is $0.005 for apps with only banner ads and the highest report is for $1 for a hard-core strategy game targeting Japan. Glu sees $0.08 globally while Kabam, A Thinking Ape, PerBlue and Dena higher levels between $0.4 and $1 for hardcore titles.
  2. ARPDAU from ads alone in tier 1 countries – the lowest we have seen is $0.005 but with Rewarded video you can get all the way to $0.09 according to some reports.
  3. LTV in tier 1 countries (IAP+Ads) – The range here is quite high. Hard-core titles can reach $20 LTV (for all users – not just payers). The good casino games can get to $10. The bottom side of the range can be quite low if the game has no monetization it can be $0.
  4. LTV in tier 1 countries (Ads Only) – The lowest we have seen using TRACEBACK is $0.1 and the highest we have seen is $1.5
  5. Rewarded Video CPMs in tier 1 countries – we have seen reports of CPM going up to $60 in some genres. The numbers can go as low as $15 for the first impression and will go down for games that expose their users to too many
  6. Video CPMs in tier 1 countries – $8 to $15 in most games but if you have too many video ads it will decline below that
  7. Interstitial CPM in tier 1 countries – $5 to $10 eCPM
  8. Banner CPM in tier 1 countries – $1 to $3 eCPM
  9. Conversion to payers – 1.5% conversion is typical on a monthly basis and 0.3% on a daily basis.
  10. Top 10% revenue contribution – The top 10% of payers typically contribute 50% of the revenue in games with consumables or currency
  11. LTV of paying users (Total ARPPU) – In hard-core strategy games the average is about $500, in casino it’s usually $200-$300, in Match-3 it can get to $150 but $50 to $100 is more typical.
  12. Ad revenue proportion – In hard-core strategy games – 0%, mid-core strategy games and simulation games get 10%-15% of their revenue from ads, Casino games can see up to 50% of their revenue from ads, card and board games typically see 25%-30% ad revenue and more casual genres typically go above 50%

Market Research

  1. Calculating MAU from Ratings on Google Play:
    • Take the Ratings count from Google Play
    • Divide by the number of years the game was live
    • Multiply by 10 to get MAU Estimate (actual MAU might be 30% higher or lower)
  2. Calculating MAU from ratings on Google Play
    • Take the minimum number of installs from Google Play
    • Divide by the number of years the game was live
    • Divide by 2 to get an estimated MAU (Actual MAU might be 30% higher or lower)
  3. Number of apps per user – Android users have 95 apps on average
  4. New apps installed per month – The average user installs 1 app per month
  5. Total revenue in Mobile games in 2015 – $34B according to AppAnnie

 

Feel free to share: